Good news for public libraries

With polling numbers like this, maybe public libraries should run for office! 🙂

Good news for public libraries

“This graphic highlights results from the Pew Internet & American Life Project survey, released December 2013. More than 6,000 Americans ages 16 and older were asked about their views of public libraries and the role these institutions serve in their communities. The results show that an overwhelming majority of Americans value libraries.”

View the full report (PDF):

[Graphic: American Libraries Magazine]

The republic of letters

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Image: Weekes Branch Library, Hayward, Calif.

“There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.” ― Andrew Carnegie

Branching out

The local newspaper reporter called me up earlier this week, wanting to do a story on our seed lending library. Already, I’m thrilled. So we talk for a while about the project, about libraries, about card catalogs and antique dealers, and in particular about the enduring power of books. All in all, a very nice conversation with a very kind, very generous journalist.

Then the story comes out in this morning’s paper. I’m excited to see it there on the front of the local section, but apprehensive because you never know what angle a newspaper will take with a story until you read it. So I read it. And I’m even more thrilled. It goes something like this: Libraries are checking out more books — real, printed books — than ever before. Even in today’s world of computers everywhere, people have a seemingly unquenchable desire for real, physical books and libraries. Plus, libraries are adding new services that people want and need, like after school homework tutoring centers and seed lending libraries. They’re even bringing back the card catalog, which they have kept in storage all these years, just waiting for the right time to bring it back into the sunlight again. Old is new again, and it’s a good thing.

It warms my heart. Given the theme of the article, it seemed only appropriate to share it in true “vintage” printed newspaper format and layout. The web version doesn’t really do it justice.
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Change is in the air

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Image: Sign spotted at Pike Street Market, Seattle, during the American Library Association midwinter meeting, January 2013.

Lately we’ve been seeing more and more common sense, passionate appeals in favor of libraries and their continued importance in society. This new, distinctly 21st century sensibility to libraries has the feeling of rediscovering an old friend, and riffs on a central theme: The public library is a vital local resource; it is well-known and heavily used more than ever before, even in this digital age; and it has a rich and vibrant history rooted in the foundations of human civilization itself.

What is perhaps most remarkable, is that this new trend of pro-library sentiment is showing up all over, from the mainstream media to the relatively obscure corners of blogosphere where one finds stories like the one linked above (and where City Literal proudly resides). This reversal of fortune, which may be an outgrowth of the “new normal” created by the Great Recession, is so astonishingly different than the zeitgeist of just a few years ago when everyone was gloomily (or gleefully, depending on who you listened to) predicting the final demise of the library. The change is, well, refreshing. And frankly, it’s long overdue (no pun intended).

Link to blog post: Why Libraries Are Important. (from “A Little Blog of Books and Other Stuff.”

Do it today

Do it today.

Did you know that people who read books in their free time are also more likely to attend a sports event? And readers are over two-and-a-half times more likely to volunteer in their community. Reading books is good not just for the reader, but for the community and the economy. So today, put down your smartphone and close your laptop for one hour, and put your face in a book.

(Data source: “Reading on the Rise: A New Chapter in American Literacy,” a 2009 report by the National Endowment for the Arts.)

Tough call: Librarian to the President — or to BeyoncĂ©?

Tough call: Librarian to the President -- or to Beyoncé?

I’m so lucky to have my dream job already. But if I was looking for a new dream job, I’d have a tough decision to make right now: librarian to the President — or librarian to BeyoncĂ©?
President: http://1.usa.gov/12CNwm3
Beyoncé: http://bit.ly/HPL-beyonce

(Both are real librarian jobs, now hiring)