Good news for public libraries

With polling numbers like this, maybe public libraries should run for office! 🙂

Good news for public libraries

“This graphic highlights results from the Pew Internet & American Life Project survey, released December 2013. More than 6,000 Americans ages 16 and older were asked about their views of public libraries and the role these institutions serve in their communities. The results show that an overwhelming majority of Americans value libraries.”

View the full report (PDF):

[Graphic: American Libraries Magazine]

The republic of letters

weekes-lion-carnegie

Image: Weekes Branch Library, Hayward, Calif.

“There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.” ― Andrew Carnegie

Branching out

The local newspaper reporter called me up earlier this week, wanting to do a story on our seed lending library. Already, I’m thrilled. So we talk for a while about the project, about libraries, about card catalogs and antique dealers, and in particular about the enduring power of books. All in all, a very nice conversation with a very kind, very generous journalist.

Then the story comes out in this morning’s paper. I’m excited to see it there on the front of the local section, but apprehensive because you never know what angle a newspaper will take with a story until you read it. So I read it. And I’m even more thrilled. It goes something like this: Libraries are checking out more books — real, printed books — than ever before. Even in today’s world of computers everywhere, people have a seemingly unquenchable desire for real, physical books and libraries. Plus, libraries are adding new services that people want and need, like after school homework tutoring centers and seed lending libraries. They’re even bringing back the card catalog, which they have kept in storage all these years, just waiting for the right time to bring it back into the sunlight again. Old is new again, and it’s a good thing.

It warms my heart. Given the theme of the article, it seemed only appropriate to share it in true “vintage” printed newspaper format and layout. The web version doesn’t really do it justice.
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Old is new again

People sometimes ask me, “Whatever happened to the card catalog”? Hayward Public Library was one the first libraries to computerize its catalog way back in the 1980′s. Since that time, our card catalogs have been officially out of service. But we have kept them in storage for all these years, just waiting for the right reason to use them again. Meanwhile, library card catalogs have been showing up on the antiques market lately, some at eye-popping prices. According to antique dealers, card catalogs are now considered retro-chic, very desirable, and they are getting harder and harder to find. Just in my four years as library director, the number of people who have asked me if we still have our card catalogs and if we would sell them, runs in the double digits. Apparently, card catalogs make great storage for curios, wine, yarn, socks, etc., and are even used as display furnishings in high-end boutiques – who knew? But my answer was always no – not only because they’re public property, but also because along with library books and library cards, the card catalog is one of the most emblematic symbols of the library’s rich and proud history, and it still has value and utility even in this day and age of computers everywhere. In fact, we have found the perfect use for the card catalogs again, and will soon be bringing them back into the sunlight in a new and innovative way.

seed-library

We’re starting a seed lending library this coming April. And as it turns out, the old card catalog is just the right size for organizing and storing the seed packets. I’m looking forward to this great new resource, and I think our community will be excited about it, too. There’s a certain zen-like harmony to the idea: re-using and re-purposing that which is useful; life springs anew; sharing information and resources with the whole community; all that good stuff. It’s funny, I remember using the card catalogs in the Main Library when I was a kid. I wonder if I opened that very same drawer, way back then? Today, as a librarian who has the incredible good fortune to work and serve in my hometown library, it will be satisfying to see the card catalogs back in useful service again, as they should be — in the public library where everyone can enjoy and benefit from them (not just the wine and yarn collectors). Stay tuned for more announcements about the seed lending library and our first annual Seed Read and Plant-a-Thon event, coming soon.

Tough call: Librarian to the President — or to BeyoncĂ©?

Tough call: Librarian to the President -- or to Beyoncé?

I’m so lucky to have my dream job already. But if I was looking for a new dream job, I’d have a tough decision to make right now: librarian to the President — or librarian to BeyoncĂ©?
President: http://1.usa.gov/12CNwm3
Beyoncé: http://bit.ly/HPL-beyonce

(Both are real librarian jobs, now hiring)

Passing the torch of knowledge to a new generation

The latest issue of Rotary International’s monthly magazine The Rotarian features a cover story on the allure of books by “negative-styled humorist” and Wall Street Journal columnist Joe Queenan. Of particular note are the accompanying photo illustrations, which I found to be as intriguing and thought-provoking as the article itself.

As a proud member of my local Rotary club, I know how much Rotary supports reading and literacy in communities around the world. For example, here in Hayward the Rotary club raises over $20,000 each year to provide a children’s dictionary to every third grader in Hayward — all 2,200 of them. As a librarian, I know that studies show that children who have access to books in their home do better in school, go farther in their educations, and earn more in later life. But as a Rotarian, for me the best part of the dictionary project is simpler than that — it’s seeing these children’s faces light up when they first get their dictionaries and start leafing through the pages. These dictionaries are beautiful hardcover editions, filled with gorgeous full color photos and illustrations, almost like single-volume encyclopedias. And when we tell them that these books are theirs to keep, the looks of delight and amazement on their faces… well, it is a priceless moment. And when they ask, why is Rotary giving us these books?, the answer is equally priceless — because we care about you, we care about kids in our community, and we want you have everything you need to learn and grow and do your very best in school.

That connection, that passing of the torch of knowledge is one of the essential joys of reading. Learning is a lifelong adventure that deepens and enriches our lives in so many ways. And we all have a part to play in paying it forward to the next generation through the enduring power of books.

Rotary International has 1.2 million members in more than 34,000 clubs worldwide. Rotary members volunteer in communities in every corner of the globe, at home and abroad to support education and job training, provide clean water, combat hunger, improve health and sanitation, and eradicate polio. To learn more, and to find a Rotary club in your community, visit www.rotary.org.

rotarian 1

Documenting the history of Hayward’s Gay Prom

​Library Journal published a feature story on Hayward Public Library’s teen filmmaking project, Now We Can Dance: The Story of the Hayward Gay Prom. The film is a remarkable achievement–a moving and inspiring look into the history, meaning, importance, and impact of the Hayward Gay Prom, one of the longest-running LGBTQ youth events of its kind in the country. It features several past and present attendees and organizers of the prom, as well as local leaders who played key roles in forming and supporting the event. Eighteen months in the making, the film was produced by local Hayward youth under the guidance of Academy-Award winning documentarian Debra Chasnoff (Deadly Deception; Let’s Get Real) and library staff with a grant from CalHumanities and additional support provided by Friends of Hayward Public Library.As well as being a celebration of a very special and unique youth event, Now We Can Dance masterfully and unflinchingly examines the pool of hate and intolerance that has been directed toward LGBTQ youth from the Gay Prom’s inception in 1995 to the present day, embodied in the sickening protests that accompany the event, and it brilliantly captures how the community literally “bands together” to respond to and neutralize these hateful displays. The manner in which the event’s supporters counteract the poisonous viewpoints of the protesters is nothing short of triumphant. A bit rough around the edges production-wise, but otherwise flawless in its passion and grace, Now We Can Dance, is unquestionably a landmark achievement in the history of HPL, one that “takes the concept of a local history project to the next level,” to paraphrase the LJ article.

The next stop for the film will hopefully be acceptance to the upcoming Frameline film festival in San Francisco where the film has been submitted for consideration, and beyond that, possible distribution to a wider audience via DVD.

Kudos to my colleague Laurie Willis for her extraordinary work producing this film.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/library-services/library-as-filmmaker-documenting-the-creation-of-a-california-towns-gay-prom/